Monday, October 12, 2020

Snatch Blocks

Took me a while to find a snatch block that:

a) American/Canadian/Australian/Western European made;
b) Reasonably priced.

http://www.masterpull.com/snatch-blocks/


Yep, has a great feel. Not greasable, but it's not like I'll be using this on a regular basis. Being bearing, it has less rolling resistance than the "rings" due.

The snatch block has a 15,000# Working Load Limit (2:1 30,000# breaking) with a 3/4" Van Beest (Dutch made) shackle rated at 4.75 metric tons (10,450# WLL; 6:1 for a breaking strength of 62,700#).

This combination was $105 for the snatch block, $16 for the shackle. (I bought a couple extra shackles to hit the free shipping total).


Compare that to a Warn Epic snatch block rated at 12,000# and Epic shackle which is currently running about $145 combined on Amazon made of the Chinesium you might trust just because Warn was willing to put their name on it...

(And it's not that China can't produce really high quality stuff, they can and do -- it's just the marketing position is usually Western companies wanting to maximize profits buying from Chinese trying to maximize profits, and dealing with a den full of Ferengis. Then add in the Amazon distribution system that easily allows counterfeit goods so you may not be getting an actual Warn snatch but a counterfeit...nope. Items that would show signs of failure early and easily like tree savers and tow straps? Much less of a concern for me for either China or Amazon. Metal that needs proper casting and finishing? No chance.)

Does it have all the features I'd like...having the Country of Origin and WLL limit stamped instead of being a label (though the label feels very high quality) would be my preference, and that's about my only criticism. However I also plan to store it within a Crown Royal bag within my gear bag so that should help protect the snatch block. The shackles will go in their own bags as well (to help reduce metal-on-metal banging).

1 comment:

Scruggs Earl said...

For example, self-demagnetizing metals won’t damage the object being demagnetized. what is the cheapest metal Make sure you know what type of metal you’re working with before trying to demagnetize it.